Standardizing development environments with Vagrant

Standardizing development environments with Vagrant

This is the first article of a series in which we'll explain our development process industrialisation. We'll describe how we went from a team of individuals doing things together but artisanally, to a more industrial and qualitative approach. This first topic talks about how we standardized our development environments with Vagrant.

This is a post I wrote for NOE interactive.

Read the rest of this article on NOE's blog

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@overnetcity OMG dude, les cheveux de ouf!17 May / 09:21